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The RAF Squadrons involved in WW2 in Belgium



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Squadron 101 to 150

Click to go on the right squadron
101 Squadron
102 Squadron
103 Squadron
105 Squadron
106 Squadron
107 Squadron
109 Squadron
110 Squadron
111 Squadron
115 Squadron
121 Squadron
122 Squadron
126 Squadron
127 Squadron
128 Squadron
129 Squadron
130 Squadron
132 Squadron
137 Squadron
139 Squadron
140 Squadron
141 Squadron
142 Squadron
144 Squadron
149 Squadron
150 Squadron

cest raf squadron

101 Squadron

The squadron was reformed in March 1928 at RAF Bircham Newton as a day bomber squadron. In 1938 the squadron was equipped with the Bristol Blenheim. In 1941 the squadron changed to a medium-bomber squadron with the Vickers Wellington. These were replaced the following year with the Avro Lancaster. 101 Squadron Lancasters were in 1943 equipped with a top secret radio jamming system codenamed "Airborne Cigar" (ABC) operated by an eighth crew member who could understand German, some with German or Jewish backgrounds known as "special operators" commonly abbreviated to "spec ops" or "SO". They sat in a curtained off area towards the rear of the aircraft and located and jammed German fighter controllers broadcasts, occasionally posing as controllers to spread disinformation. The aircraft fitted with the system were distinctive due to the two large vertical antennae rising from the middle of the fuselage. Deliberately breaking the standing operating procedure of radio silence to conduct the jamming made the aircraft highly vulnerable to being tracked and attacked, which resulted in 101 Squadron having the highest casualty rate of any RAF squadron. Since October 1943, they flew 2477 sorties with ABC, losing 1094 crew killed and 178 POWs.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 101 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster PB258-SR-V fallen Braver (D) on 15/01/1944
* Crash of Wellington R1703-SR-J fallen to Boxbergheide on 1/09/1941
* Crash of Lancaster DV285-SR-Q fallen to Aywaille on 26/11/1943
* Crash of Wellington Z1594-SR fallen to Ougrée on 25/08/1942
* Crash of Wellington X3754-SR fallen to Wandre on 28/08/1942
* Crash of Lancaster PB634 SR-U fallen in Germany on 28/12/1944
* Crash of Lancaster DV308-SR-V fallen to Grandrieu on 2/01/1944
* Crash of Lancaster LL862-SR-K fallen outside of borders on 21/07/1944
* Crash of Lancaster LL771-SR-Y fallen outside of borders on 11/10/1944
* Crash of Lancaster W4967-SR-P fallen to Kortrijk on 21/01/1944
* Crash of Wellington X9828-SR fallen off coast on 24/10/1941
* Crash of Lancaster LL758-SR-A fallen to Trembleur on 5/10/1944

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102 Squadron

No 102 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Hingham, Norfolk, in August 1917, and from September 1917 until the Armistice served on the Western Front as a night-bomber squadron equipped with FE2b's; its duties included night bombing of enemy airfields, railheads and billets, night reconnaissance and the machine-gunning of troops and transport. During its service on the Western Front the squadron dropped a total of almost 365 tons of bombs, 317 tons of which were dropped between 21st March 1918 - the day on which the Germans launched their spring offensive - and the Armistice. Trains were bombed on 93 occasions and transport on 113 occasions.
Disbanded in 1919, No 102 re-formed in 1936 as a heavy bomber squadron and when war came again it was flying Whitleys. On the second night of the war - 4/5th September 1939 - three of its Whitleys dropped propaganda leaflets on the Ruhr.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 102 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Halifax MZ649-DY-Y fallen on 28/05/1944
* Crash of Halifax MZ798-DY-M fallen to Leuven on 2/11/1944
* Crash of Whitley Z6837-DY fallen to Schaffen on 1/09/1941
* Crash of Halifax NA175 DY-Q fallen to Lommel on 8/02/1945
* Crash of Halifax JD144-DY-Q fallen to Barvaux-en-Condroz on 25/06/1943
* Crash of Halifax LW141-DY-U fallen in Germany on 2/11/1944
* Crash of Halifax MZ772-DY-Q fallen in Germany on 5/11/1944
* Crash of Halifax JB835-DY-X fallen to Auvelais, on 28/08/1943
* Crash of Crew of Halifax BB249-DY-Z fallen to Eprave on 10/07/1943
* Crash of Halifax W7653-DY-A fallen to Hamois on 28/04/1942
Halifax W7913-DY-C fallen to Resteigne on 3/12/1942

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103 Squadron

No 103 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Beaulieu, Hampshire, on 1st September 1917, and in the following year was employed on day-bombing and reconnaissance on the Western Front with DH9 aircraft. Disbanded in 1919 it was re-formed in August 1936, as No 103 (Bomber) Squadron with Hawker Hinds. During the Second World War No 103 Squadron made short-range day- and night-bombing attacks with Fairey Battles (including attacks on the Meuse bridges and the "invasion ports") and longer-range attacks with Wellingtons, then Halifaxes and, finally, Lancasters. In August 1943, it contributed 24 Lancasters to the force of 600-odd Bomber Command "heavies" which was sent to make the first-ever raid on the German V-weapons experimental station at Peenemunde. The most distinguished Lancaster of them all, Lancaster III ED888 "M2" ("Mike Squared"), was resident for part of it's career with No. 103 Squadron. The aircraft made its first operational sortie - to Dortmund on 4/5th May 1943, and on retirement in December 1944, had logged 140 trips (the first 66 with No 103 Squadron, then 65 with No 576 Squadron and then 9 more with No 103 Squadron) totalling 974 operational hours. This was a Bomber Command record and it is sad to reflect that "Mike Squared" was not selected for preservation after the war.1
1. After languishing at a maintenance unit for several months, "M2" was reduced to scrap in or about January 1947.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 103 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster ND700-PM-X fallen to Hallaar on 12/05/1944
* Crash of Lancaster JB733-PM-K fallen to Loenhout on 12/05/1944
* Crash of Wellington N2849-PM fallen to Hamont-Achel on 16/06/1941
* Crash of Halifax W1216-PM-Q fallen to Rosmeer on 5/10/1942
* Crash of Battle L5514 fallen to Botassart on 26/05/1940
* Crash of Battle K9264- PM-L fallen to Hotton on 10/05/1940
* Crash of Battle K9270-PM fallen to Hotton on 10/05/1940
* Crash of Battle P2193-PM fallen to Noirefontaine on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Lancaster W5012-PM-O fallen to Gesves on 4/07/1943
* Crash of Halifax BB204-PM fallen to Hastière on 28/08/1942
* Crash of Lancaster ND-925-PM-C fallen to Veurne on 28/05/1944

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105 Squadron

No 105 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Andover, Hampshire, in September 1917, and was originally intended as a bomber unit for service in France. In April 1918, however, plans were changed: it was ordered to mobilize as a corps reconnaissance squadron for service in Ireland and in May it proceeded to Omagh, Co. Tyrone, equipped with RE8 aircraft. In December 1918, it was re-equipped with Bristol Fighters.
Disbanded in 1920, No 105 was re-formed at Harwell as a bomber squadron in 1937 and equipped with Hawker Audaxes which were replaced later in the year by Fairey Battles. In the early months of the Second World War it served with the Advanced Air Striking Force in France, and in May 1940, was one of the squadrons which attacked the Meuse bridges in an attempt to stem the German advance. In July 1940, following its return to England, the squadron was re-armed with Blenheims and subsequently played a prominent part in No. 2 Group's bombing offensive against fringe targets in Germany, France and the Low Countries, and against shipping in the North Sea. Like most other Blenheim units of No. 2 Group, No 105 was, for a while, detached to Malta, whence it operated against targets in the Mediterranean and North Africa. In 1942 No 105 became the first squadron to receive Mosquitoes and with these fast and highly manoeuvrable aircraft it made daring attacks in daylight against objectives as far afield as the Gestapo Headquarters in Oslo (25th September 1942), the Burmeister and Wain Diesel engine works at Copenhagen (27th January 1943), and the main broadcasting station in Berlin (30th January 1943). On this last occasion the attack - it was the first daylight attack made by the RAF on Berlin - was timed to coincide with a speech by Field Marshal Göring and kept him off the air for more than an hour.
In the summer of 1943 No 105 was equipped with Oboe and, with its Mosquitoes wearing unfamiliar matt black paint, took its place among the first rank of the Pathfinder squadrons. It remained an Oboe Mosquito unit for the rest of the European war and among the many notable highlights of this period was 5/6th June 1944 - the eve of D-Day - when its Mosquitos helped to ground mark ten coastal batteries in support of the Allied invasion of Normandy.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 105 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Battle K9485-GB fallen to Bouillon on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Blenheim T1890-GB fallen to Peutie on 15/11/1940
* Crash of Mosquito DK339-GB fallen to Sint-Truiden on 9/10/1942
* Crash of Mosquito W4064 fallen to Bazel on 31/05/1942
* Crash of Mosquito DK309-GB fallen to Gent on 18/08/1942
* Crash of Blenheim T1897-GB fallen to Zedelgem on 11/12/1940
* Crash of Blenheim V6318-GB-B fallen off coast on 23/04/1941

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106 Squadron

... At the outbreak of the Second World War the squadron was flying Hampdens with No. 5 Group, and until early 1941 had a training role. It then reverted to front-line status and began regular night bombing operations against Fortress Europe.
After a short spell with Manchesters, No 106 converted to Lancasters in the early summer of 1942 (but it did not become converted completely to Lancasters before some of the Manchesters had participated in the 1,000-bomber raids on Cologne, Essen and Bremen). In October it contributed 10 Lancasters to No. 5 Group's epic dusk raid on Le Creusot and two more (one of them piloted by Wing Commander Guy Gibson who was then No 106's CO) to the subsidiary raid on Montchanin. In 1943 it took part in the first "shuttle-bombing" raids (when the targets were Friedrichshafen and Spezia) and the famous attack on Peenemunde. Among the targets attacked in 1944 were a coastal gun battery at St. Pierre du Mont and the V1 storage sites in the caves at St. Leu d'Esserent. In December 1944, it made a 1,900-mile round trip to bomb the German Baltic Fleet at Gdynia, while in March 1945, it was represented in the bomber force that so pulverised the defences of Wesel just before the Rhine crossing that Commandos were able to seize the town with only 36 casualties. In April 1945, came the last of the squadron's operations against the enemy - a bombing attack on an oil refinery at Vallo (Tonsberg) in Norway, and a simultaneous minelaying expedition to the Oslo fjord.
During the Second World War No 106 Squadron operated on 496 nights and 46 days, flying 5,834 operational sorties. In so doing it lost 187 aircraft - a percentage loss on sorties flown of 3.21 - but on the credit side its gunners claimed 20 enemy aircraft destroyed, 3 probably destroyed and 29 damaged. A total of 267 decorations were won by the squadron, including a Victoria Cross awarded to Sergeant NC Jackson for conspicuous bravery during an attack on Schweinfurt on 26/27th April 1944.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 106 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Hampden X3002-ZN fallen to Maria-ter-Heide on 4/03/1941
* Crash of Hampden AD862-ZN fallen to Eben-Emael on 3/07/1941
* Crash of Lancaster R5573-ZN-B fallen to Harzé on 9/07/1943
* Crash of Hampden AD756-ZN fallen to Gembloux on 17/08/1941
* Crash of Lancaster ND585-ZN-J fallen to Philippeville on 31/03/1944
* Crash of Lancaster R5914-ZN fallen to Poelkapelle on 21/12/1942
* Crash of Lancaster R5684-ZN-P fallen off coast on 25/08/1942

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107 Squadron

No 107 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Lake Down, Salisbury, on 15th May 1918, and early in June it went to the Western Front as a day-bomber squadron equipped with DH9 aircraft. Its first raid was made on 30th June and day bombing of enemy targets was maintained until the Armistice. The squadron's most successful raid was made on Saponay on 21st July; large ammunition dumps were hit, and from the squadron's airfield, 20 miles away, the reflection of the explosions and fire could be seen going on all the evening. Another notable raid was that made on Aulnoye railway station and junction on 1st October. This resulted in the destruction of several ammunition trains in the sidings and a leave train carrying 900 troops, all of whom were killed with the exception of one officer and his batman.
Disbanded in 1919, No 107 re-formed at Upavon in 1936 - again as a bomber unit - and at first flew Hawker Hinds. Blenheims came next and on 4th September 1939, the squadron contributed four of these aircraft to the RAF's first air attack of World War 2 - the raid on the German warships near Wilhelmshaven. Only one of No 107's aircraft returned from this operation - and with its bomb load intact.1
No 107 Squadron, flying Blenheims, then Bostons and, finally, Mosquitos, subsequently took part in scores of raids, including such other notable ones as the mass low-level daylight raid on the Knapsack and Quadrath power stations near Cologne, on 12th August 1941; the great combined raid on Dieppe on 19th August 1942 (its task on this occasion was to bomb hostile shore batteries and thus reduce enemy opposition to the landing force); and the low-level daylight raid on the Philips radio and valve factory at Eindhoven on 6th December 1942. For a brief spell in 1941/42 the squadron operated from Malta, whilst in the closing stages of the European war (from November 1944, onwards) it operated from the Continent.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 107 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Blenheim P4905-OM fallen to Bettincourt on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Blenheim P4914-OM fallen to Voroux-Goreux on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Boston Z2157-OM fallen to Wevelgem on 7/11/1942

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109 Squadron

No. 109 Squadron was first formed in 1918 and the only other information available concerning its early history is that its role was bomber training and that it disbanded in 1919. On 10th December 1940, the squadron was re-born from the Wireless Intelligence Development Unit (WIDU) whose headquarters were at Boscombe Down, Wilts. Using Anson and Wellington aircraft it was engaged during the next two years in development of radio counter-measures and also new radar aids, notably the blind bombing system known as Oboe. In August, 1942, No. 109 moved to Wyton to become one of the original units of the Pathfinder Force.1 In December it converted to Oboe Mosquitoes and on 2Oth/21st made World War 2 history by flying the first Oboe sorties over enemy territory - on a calibration raid against a power station at Lutterade in Holland. Eight nights later, on 31st December/1st January 1943, it made history again when it pioneered Oboe target marking for a following force of heavy bombers; the target was Düsseldorf.
The squadron remained an Oboe Mosquito marker unit for the rest of the war and from mid-1943 had a friendly PFF rival in No. 105 Squadron. One of No. 109's most outstanding successes was on 5/6th March, 1943, when eight of its Mosquitoes led Bomber Command's devastating assault on Essen which laid waste more than 160 acres of that city and heralded the Battle of the Ruhr. Included among the squadron's many other wartime claims to fame is the claim that the last bombs to be dropped on Berlin were dropped by one of its Mosquitos at 2.14am on 21st April, 1945. On 30 September 1945 the Squadron was disbanded.
Among the scores of decorations won by No. 109 Squadron personnel was a Victoria Cross. It was awarded posthumously to Squadron Leader BAM Palmer, "in recognition of most conspicuous bravery" while flying a Lancaster of No. 582 Squadron (mainly with a 582 Squadron crew) and acting as Oboe leader of a Lancaster force against Cologne on 23rd December 1944.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 109 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Blenheim L9175-VE fallen to Kaggevine on 11/05/1940
* Crash of Mosquito PF447-HS fallen to Melsbroek on 5/03/1945
* Crash of Mosquito LR508-HS fallen to Melsbroek on 25/04/1945
* Crash of Wellington Z1048-ZP fallen to Burdinne on 9/06/1942
* Crash of Mosquito MM178-HS-V fallen to Adinkerke on 19/10/1944

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110 Squadron

No. 110 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Rendcombe, Gloucestershire, on 1st November 1917, crossed to France in late August/early September 1918, for duty with the Independent Force, and during the remainder of World War I was employed on long-distance day bombing with DH9A aircraft - the first squadron to employ this aircraft. Its original complement of DH9As were the gift of His Serene Highness the Nizam of Hyderabad. Each aircraft bore an inscription to that effect, and the unit became known as the Hyderabad Squadron.1
Disbanded in 1919, No. 110 re-formed in 1937 - again as a bomber unit - and on 4th September 1939, led the RAF's first bombing raid of World War 2 when five of its Blenheims flew from the civil airport at Ipswich (to which No. 110 had been detached from its base at Wattisham on 2nd September) to attack German warships near Wilhelmshaven.2 The squadron moved to India early in 1942.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 110 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Blenheim L9175-VE fallen to Kaggevine on 11/05/1940

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111 Squadron

11 Squadron played a role in the Battle of Britain, pioneering dangerous head-on attacks against the Luftwaffe bomber streams. Claims included 47 aircraft shot down for 18 Hurricanes lost. The squadron replaced its Hurricanes with Supermarine Spitfires in April 1941. In November the Squadron again relocated to RAF Gibraltar for support of Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa. In a similar role it moved to Malta in June 1943 to support Operation Husky, the invasion of Sicily. No 111 moved through Italy with the advancing Allied ground forces and remained there until the end of the war, after which it moved to Austria.
The squadron disbanded in May 1947. 269 aircraft were claimed shot down, making the squadron one of the top RAF scorers for the war.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 111 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Hurricane P3105 fallen off the Belgian coast on 11/08/1940

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115 Squadron

... Disbanded in 1919, the squadron was re-formed as No 115 (Bomber) Squadron in 1937 and in the Second World War took part in scores of raids and also played an active part in Gardening (minelaying) for victory. In April 1940, while flying Wellingtons (and while on temporary loan to Coastal Command) it gained the distinction of making the RAF's first bombing raid of the war on a mainland target-the enemy-held Norwegian airfield of Stavanger/Sola. Sixteen months later, in August 1941, it undertook the initial Service trials of Gee, the first of the great radar navigational and bombing aids.1 As a result of its subsequent report on these trials Gee was put into large-scale production for Bomber Command.
From the spring of 1943 onwards No 115 flew Lancasters and for a while it was one of the relatively few operational units to use the Mark II version. The mighty Lancaster, with its huge bomb load, was probably the best-known bomber of all time and in the closing months of the war No 115 had two particularly distinguished specimens - Lancaster Is ME803 and '836. The former joined the squadron in May 1944, and between 31st May/1st June that year when it bombed Trappes West marshalling yards and 22nd April 1945, when it bombed Bremen, it logged 105 operational sorties. From May to October 1944, it served with "C" Flight (which had formed in November 1943) and was coded "A4-D". "C" Flight became the nucleus of No 195 Squadron in October 1944, but ME803 remained with No 115 and was re-coded "KO-L"; it retained these letters up to and including 27th February 1945, the date of its 101st operational sortie (if not longer), and made its subsequent trips - beginning 9/10th April - as "IL-B" of the new "C" Flight, which had begun operations in November 1944. In May 1945, ME803 was transferred to No 1659 HCU.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 115 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Lancaster DS734-KO-Y fallen to Mechelen on 25/04/1944
*,Crash of Wellington 9298-KO-H crashed on 21/05/1940
* Crash of Lancaster ND745-A4-D fallen on 23/05/1944
* Crash of Lancaster ND923-KO-C fallen to Leuven on 12/05/1944
* Crash of Halifax DS627-KO-R fallen to Hechtel on 30/05/1943
* Crash of Lancaster HK542-KO-J fallen to Sint-Truiden on 25/04/1944
* Crash of Wellington X3675-KO-D fallen to Grand-Hallet on 28/08/1942
* Crash of Lancaster DS680-KO-L fallen to Hermée on 17/11/1943
* Crash of Lancaster DS690-KO-C fallen to Bertrix on 14/07/1943
* Crash of Lancaster NG332-IL-D fallen to Gembloux on 1/01/1945
* Crash of on Lancaster LL943-KO-C fallen to La Plaigne on 19/07/1944
*,Crash of Wellington Z8788-KO-H fallen to Snaaskerke on 21/07/1941

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121 Squadron

The squadron was reformed on 14 May 1941 as No. 121 (Eagle) Squadron at RAF Kirton-in-Lindsey, the second of three Eagle Squadrons manned by American volunteers. Equipped with the Hawker Hurricane, the squadron then converted to the Supermarine Spitfire and moved south to RAF North Weald to begin operations on channel sweeps and Rhubarb operations. On 15 November 1941 the squadron claimed its first enemy aircraft destroyed.
The squadron then upgraded to cannon-armed Spitfire VBs and carried out offensive operations over the channel and providing bomber escorts.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 121 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire W3711 fallen to Bredene on 7/12/1941

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122 Squadron

The squadron was formed on 1 January 1918 at Sedgeford as a day bomber unit with the Airco DH.4, the intention was to train the squadron for operations on the de Havilland DH.9 but the squadron disbanded without seeing action on 17 August 1918. The squadron was reformed at RAF Upper Heyford in October 1918 with the intent to operate the de Havilland DH.10 but the Armistice was declared before the squadron had any aircraft and it was disbanded without being operational on 20 November 1918.
No. 122 was reformed in 1941 at RAF Turnhouse with the Supermarine Spitfire I to operate convoy patrols in the Firth of Forth, it soon moved south into England to become part of the Hornchurch Wing with cannon-equipped Spitfires and it flew sweeps over northern France and participated in the Dieppe operations. In 1942 František Fajtl became the squadron commander, the first Czech to lead a RAF squadron. In October 1942 it was reequipped with the Spitfire IX and continued operations over France.
In January 1944 it re-equipped with the North American Mustang to operate long-range bomber escort duties and it also attacked targets in France and the Low Countries. Within a few months the Mustangs were converted into fighter-bombers and the squadron started long-range ground-attack sorties into continental Europe. It was heavily involved in D-Day operations and within a few weeks had moved to France to support the invasion. After three-months of intense operations the squadron was withdrawn to England and continued till the end of the war providing long-range escorts to both Bomber Command and the United States 8th Air Force.
After the end of the war the squadron was re-equipped with the Spitfire F21 but was disbanded at RAF Dalcross on 1 April 1946 when it was renumbered No. 41 Squadron.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 122 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire BM404-MT-A fallen to Ploegsteert on 05/05/1942
* Crash of Spitfire BM261 fallen to Ploegsteert on 5/05/1942
* Crash of Spitfire BM138-MT-N fallen to Ploegsteert on 5/05/1942
* Crash of Spitfire BM321 fallen to Heuvelland on 5/05/1942

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126 Squadron

No. 126 Squadron was formed at Old Sarum on 1 February 1918 as a day bomber unit but was disbanded on 17 August 1918 before becoming operational.
On 28 June 1941, No. 126 was reformed again at Takali with Hurricanes for the defence of Malta against enemy attacks from Sicily. In March 1942 the Squadron received Spitfires which were flown in the same role until February 1943 when the Squadron started offensive sweeps over Sicily. In August 1943 the Squadron received a flight of Spitfire IXs before it moved to newly captured bases in Sicily, moving on to Italy in October where it remained until 1 April 1944. The Squadron then returned to the UK and equipped with Spitfire IXs, started escort missions from south-west England at the end of May. In August 1944 No. 126 moved to East Anglia for escort duties, converting to Mustangs in December for the same role. After the end of the war the Squadron stayed in East Anglia re-equipping with Spitfire XVIs in February 1946, before disbanding on 10 March 1946
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 126 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire MK418 fallen to Nieuwpoort on 8/12/1944

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127 Squadron

No. 127 Squadron was formed on 1 February 1918 as a day bomber unit but was disbanded on 4 July 1918 before becoming operational.
On 29 June 1941, a detachment of four Hurricanes and four Gladiators to be based at Haditha in Iraq was re-designated No. 127 Squadron. During the occupation of Syria in July it flew fighter and reconnaissance missions until it was renumbered No. 261 Squadron on 12 July 1941. No. 127 reformed at Kasfareet from a detachment of ground personnel from No. 249 Squadron and acted as a sevicing echelon until receiving Hurricanes in March 1942. In June the Squadron moved to the Western Desert for fighter operations before being placed on air defence duties in Egypt in September. In April 1944 the Squadron moved back to the UK and re-assembled at North Weald on 23 April. Operations with Spitfire fighter-bomber missions began on 19 May and in August 1944 the Squadron moved to France where it flew fighter-bomber sweeps until disbanding on 30 April 1945.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 127 squadron was involved:

Crash of Spitfire PT772 fallen on 2/10/1944
* Crash of Blenheim N6215-XD fallen to Lanaken on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Spitfire PL326 fallen off coast on 11/09/1944

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128 Squadron

No. 128 Squadron Royal Flying Corps was formed on 1 February 1918 and became a unit of the Royal Air Force, but it disbanded on 4 July 1918 having not become operational.
The squadron reformed in 1941 from a fighter unit equipped with Hurricanes in Sierra Leone. It was disbanded in 1943 and reformed in 1944 at RAF Wyton with Mosquitos as part of the Light Night Striking Force.
From 20 September 1945 the unit was based Melsbroek, Belgium and then briefly in Germany before being disbanded upon renumbering to 14 Squadron on 31 March 1946.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 128 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Mosquito KB210-MS-P fallen to Liege on 17/09/1944
* Crash of Typhoon MP186-V fallen outside the borders on 24/12/1944

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129 Squadron

No. 129 Squadron was reformed on 16 June 1941 at RAF Leconfield equipped with Spitfires.
As a result of the Indian government raising large sums of money through its sale of War Bonds a number of squadrons within the RAF were given names of Indian cities and provinces in recognition of this. No. 129 became No. 129 (Mysore) Squadron being named after Mysore province in southwest India. The squadron's badge, the Ghunda Berunda of Mysore, also reflects this association.
After spending August 1942 providing bomber escort and undertaking offensive sweeps over France the squadron moved to Orkney in Northern Scotland to provide local air defence.
The squadron returned south in February 1943 undertaking anti-shipping and escort missions. 129 Squadron became part of the 2nd Tactical Air Force in June 1943 converting to the P-51 Mustang in April 1944 in time for Operation Overlord. After forming part of the 133 (Polish) Wing for D-Day the squadron returned to RAF Brenzett where it undertook anti V-1 activities.
With a move to East Anglia in late 1944 the squadron provided long range fighter cover for RAF Bomber Commands daylight raids.
The squadron spent from June to December 1945 in Norway converting back to Spitfires.
At RAF Church Fenton on 1 September 1946 the squadron was renumbered to No. 257 Squadron.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 129 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire MH471 fallen to Nieuwkapelle on 5/09/1943

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130 Squadron

No.130 Squadron was a fighter squadron that spent most of the Second World War on offensive duties, including fighter sweeps in 1941-43 and armed reconnaissance over Germany towards the end of the war.
The squadron was reformed on 20 June 1941 as a Spitfire fighter squadron, and became operational on 21 July. For most of the next two years the squadron flew a mix of offensive sweeps over north-west France ('leaning over the Channel'), convoy protection patrols around the coasts of Cornwall and Devon and local air defence in the south west.
In March 1943 the squadron moved to Scotland, then to Northern Ireland, before returning south to England in July. On 19 August offensive operations resumed, but only continued for a month. After this the squadron moved to Yorkshire, then Scotland, then back to northern England, before being disbanded on 13 February 1944.
Just under two months later, on 5 April 1944, No.186 Squadron at Lympne ws renumbered as the new No.130 Squadron. No.186 had been flying intruder missions over northern France as part of 2nd Tactical Air Force, and continued to fly the same missions after the change of designation.
In August 1944 the squadron received the Spitfire XIV, which it used against the V-1 flying bombs. In September, as this threat began to recede, the squadron moved to the Low Countries, and began to fly armed reconnaissance missions over German. This effectively meant finding and attacking any suitable target, with transport and airfields a priority. The squadron's fast Spitfire XIVs were also used in an attempt to find the new German Me 262 jets.
At the end of May 1945 the squadron returned to Scotland, before moving to Norway on 20 June to help with the peaceful liberation of that country, returning to the UK in November.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 130 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire RM760-RM-60 fallen to Malmedy on 31/12/1944

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132 Squadron

The squadron reformed in 1941 as a fighter unit equipped with Spitfires and then provided air defence from Peterhead, Scotland, and Southern England. It then moved to Normandy after the D-Day landings. It returned to England in September 1944 before moving to Vavuniya, Ceylon, in January 1945. It was then based in Hong Kong, and was disbanded on 15 April 1946.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 129 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Spitfire BL711 fallen off coast on 12/05/1942

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137 Squadron

The squadron was reformed at Charmy Down on 20 September 1941 and equipped with the then brand new two-engined Westland Whirlwind four-cannon fighter. The squadron became operational with them on 20 October and flew its first mission (a mandolin) four days afterwards. Unfortunately the new CO, S/Ldr Sample, was killed four days after this in a mid-air collision with a new pilot. Two days later another pilot crashed into the sea. After this bad start, No. 137 became non-operational for a period before resuming with coastal missions on 11 November. On one such mission on 12 February 1942, to escort some destroyers, they met by accident the fighter screen around the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau, losing four pilots in the event.
In June 1943 the by now worn-out Whirlwinds were replaced with Hurricane Mk.IV fighter-bombers and in July the squadron flew operationally with them again until February 1944 when the Hurricane was exchanged for the more modern and higher performance Hawker Typhoon. 137 flew this new fighter-bomber operationally from 8 February 1944 until 25 August 1945, when it was disbanded at RAF Warmwell by being renumbered to 174 Squadron.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 137 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Whirlwind P7057 fallen to Tielt on 25/04/1943
* Crash of Typhoon JR433 fallen to Zedelgem on 21/05/1944
* Crash of Typhoon MN191-P fallen outside of borders: Sitard (NL) on 18/11/1944
* Crash of Typhoon PD551 fallen to Retie on 20/09/1944

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139 Squadron

No. 139 Squadron was formed at Villaverla, Italy, on 3rd July 1918, as a fighter-reconnaissance squadron equipped with Bristol Fighters, and between that date and the Armistice it claimed the destruction of 27 enemy aircraft (a further seven were classified as "probably destroyed"). Disbanded in 1919, it was re-formed as a bomber squadron in 1936 except for the period December 1941-April 1942 when it was a general reconnaissance squadron flying Hudsons. At the beginning of the last war it was equipped with Blenheims and flew the first RAF sortie to cross the German frontier; and it won one of the first two decorations of the war.1
After duty in France (during which it suffered very heavy casualties) the squadron returned to England, re-formed, and subsequently made many attacks on fringe targets in NW Europe - including the invasion ports - and many anti-shipping sweeps.
During the early years of the war, a Jamaican newspaper, The Daily Gleaner, started a fund to buy bombers for Britain. The money Jamaica subscribed was the foundation of the "Bombers for Britain" Fund, to which many other Colonies and Dominions subsequently contributed. Jamaica herself contributed enough money to buy twelve Blenheims by 1941 and in recognition of this service it was decided, in the words of Lord Beaverbrook, the wartime Minister of Aircraft Production, "that Jamaica 's name shall evermore be linked with a squadron of the Royal Air Force".
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 139 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Blenheim N6216-XD fallen to Rekem on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Blenheim N6229-XD fallen to Tongeren on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Blenheim P4923-XD fallen to Herstal on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Mosquito DZ470-XD-N fallen to Destelbergen on 11/04/1943
* Crash of Blenheim Z7499-XD fallen off coast on 20/07/1941
* Crash of Blenheim Z7274-XD fallen off coast on 2/09/1941

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140 Squadron

No. 140 Squadron was formed at Biggin Hill on 1 May 1918 as a fighter unit for the defence of the London area and was equipped with Bristol fighters. Due to the lack of German air raids at this time, the Squadron did not go into action and was disbanded on 4 July 1918.
On 17 April 1941, No. 1416 Flight at Benson was renumbered 140 Squadron and one of its Spitfires flew the first photographic sortie of the Squadron on the same day. Blenheims were also used for night reconnaissance missions, the first of these was flown over Cherbourg on 15 November though the majority of work was done by Spitfires. Blenheim operations ceased in August 1942, but some were retained until early 1943, when Venturas were received as replacements. Few missions were flown by these before the first Mosquitoes were received in August. Spitfires continued to provide photographic coverage over large areas of occupied Europe until 1944, when the last Spitfire sortie was flown on the 27 August and No. 140 became fully equipped with Mosquitoes. Both day and night reconnaissance missions were carried out for the rest of the war but in 1945 night missions were in the majority. In September 1944, the Squadron moved to Belgium to shorten the distance to its operational areas for the rest of the war. In July 1945 it returned to the UK without aircraft and was disbanded on 10 November 1945.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 140 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Mosquito NS523 fallen to Leuven on 2/10/1944
* Crash of Mosquito MM298 fallen to Melsbroek on 19/03/1945
* Crash of

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141 Squadron

No 141 Squadron was formed at Rochford on 1 January 1918 as a home defence unit for the London Area, moving to Biggin Hill in February and giving up its mixed collection of types in favour of Bristol Fighters during March. In March 1919, it moved to Ireland where it was disbanded on 1 February 1920.
On 4 October 1939, No 141 reformed at Turnhouse and by the end of the month had received some Gladiators followed shortly afterwards by Blenheims and these two types formed the training equipment of the until the arrival of Defiants in April 1940. Becoming operational on this type on 3 June 1940, the first operational patrol was flown by No 141 on 29 June and in July it moved to West Malling. The maintenance flight was based at Biggin Hill while the Defiants used Hawkinge as an advanced airfield and it was from the latter that the Squadron had its first and last daylight encounter with the enemy. Six out of nine aircraft were lost over the Channel to Me 109s and the squadron was withdrawn to Prestwick two days later as the ineffectiveness of the Defiant against single-seat fighters became evident. In September, a detachment was sent back to southern England but this time for night patrols and the whole squadron moved there in October. In April 1941, No. 141 returned to Scotland where it converted to Beaufighters for the defence of central Scotland and north-east England. In June 1942 it moved to Tangmere for local defence and in February 1943 to south-west England where it began flying intruder missions over north-west France. At the end of April 1943, it was transferred to Wittering and began flying intruder sorties over German airfields in support of Bomber Command in June. Mosquitoes began to replace the Beaufighters in October and in December the Squadron joined No. 100 Group, sending aircraft with Bomber Command's main force to attack enemy night-fighters and their bases. This type of operation continued until the German surrender and on 7 September 1945 the Squadron was disbanded.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 141 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Beaufighter V8402-TW-F fallen to Kalmthout on 24/12/1943
* Crash of Mosquito DZ656-TW-J fallen to Helchteren on 28/04/1944
* Crash of Mosquito J941-TW-X fallen to Izegem on 28/06/1944

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142 Squadron

Re-formed at RAF Netheravon on 1 June 1934, 142 Squadron was equipped with the Fairey Battle light bomber when hostilities opened in 1939. The squadron deployed to France as part of the RAF Advanced Air Striking Force, which supported the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). Battle squadrons suffered heavy casualties after the German invasion of France in May-June 1940. After returning to Britain, the squadron was rebuilt, and in November 1940 began converting to the Vickers Wellington heavy bomber.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 142 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington Z1209-QT-Z fallen of coast on 31/05/1942
* Crash of Wellington Z1316-QT-H fallen to Balen on 30/07/1942

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144 Squadron

No 144 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Port Said, Egypt, on 2Oth March 1918. On 14th August it came under the orders of the Palestine Brigade, Royal Air Force, and by the end of the month it had been fully equipped as a bombing squadron with DH9s at Junction Station.
On the opening of the final offensive in Palestine, No 144 Squadron was with the 4Oth (Army) Wing and had 13 DH9s on charge. There was no special air activity before the offensive so that the enemy should not be warned of our intentions, but No. 144 Squadron made two important bombing raids on Der'a station in conjunction with the operations of the Arab Northern Army under Sherif Feisal and Colonel TE Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) in the eastern area on the 16th and 17th September. When the offensive began on the coastal sector on 19th September an initial bombing offensive was directed against the main Turkish telegraphic and telephonic centres whose positions were known from intelligence sources and from air photographs. No 144 Squadron bombed the central telephone exchange at El 'Affule and the headquarters and telephone exchange of the Turkish Seventh Army at Nablus, and (it seems) effectively cut the enemy's telephone communications at a vital time.
By 20th September the enemy was in headlong retreat. In the west the Turkish Eighth Army had been shattered and its remnants, together with the Seventh Army in the centre, were retiring to their doom. On the following day they were trapped in the Wadi el Far'a and completely wiped out by air attack with all RAF squadrons being concentrated in the attack. No 144 Squadron then co-operated in the advance east of the Jordan, which resulted in the capture of the Turkish Fourth Army.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 144 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Hampden AD924-PL fallen to Dilsen on 9/07/1941
* Crash of Hampden AD791-PL fallen to Oteppe-Marneffe on 8/12/1941
* Crash of Hampden P1326-PL fallen to Finnevaux on 12/05/1940

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149 Squadron

No. 149 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Yapton, Sussex, on 3rd March 1918, as a night-bomber unit and three months later went to France equipped with FE2b's. Engaged in bombing enemy communications, airfields, etc., as well as on reconnaissance duties on the Second Army Front, it dropped more than 80 tons of bombs and made 161 reconnaissances.
Two interesting details worthy of mention concern the squadron's equipment. All the FEs were fitted with a "flame reducer" designed by an officer of the squadron - Captain CES RusseIl. This successfully damped all exhaust flame, an important requirement for night-flying aircraft. All aircraft were fitted with special racks, designed by one of the squadron's mechanics which could carry either Michelin flares or bombs without modification. The FEs were thus instantly adaptable for either bombing or reconnaissance. Of the squadron's original 18 FEs which flew to France in June 1918, seven were still in service on Armistice Day.
After the Armistice No. 149 was the only FE squadron chosen to accompany the Army of Occupation into Germany. It returned to the United Kingdom in March 1919, and was disbanded at Tallaght, Co. Dublin, the following August.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 149 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Stirling BF479-OJ-E fallen to Kasterlee on 14/05/1943
* Crash of Wellington R1524-OJ-P fallen to Sint-Martens-Voeren on 5/08/1941
* Crash of Stirling R9164-OJ-Q fallen to Tongrinne on 17/09/1942
* Crash of Stirling EE880-OJ-O fallen to Tielt on 29/06/1943
* Crash of Stirling N6068-OT-J fallen to Oostende on 16/04/1942
* Crash of Stirling R9314-OJ-T fallen off coast on 6/06/1942
* Crash of Stirling LJ501-OJ-H fallen off coast on 1/06/1944
* Crash of Stirling W7508-OJ-D fallen to Beauvechain on 6/06/1942

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150 Squadron

No. 150 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Salonika, Macedonia, on 1st April 1918, as a fighter squadron and subsequently operated both in Macedonia and Turkey. Disbanded in 1919 it was re-formed in England as a bomber squadron in 1938 and equipped with Fairey Battles. In the early months of the Second World War No. 150 served with the Advanced Air Striking Force in France and in May 1940, was one of the Battle squadrons which attacked the Meuse bridges in an attempt to stem the German advance. It was withdrawn to England in June 1940, and by the end of the year was flying Wellingtons and playing its part in the strategic night-bombing offensive. In December 1942, after having flown 1,717 sorties from the United Kingdom with Battles and Wellingtons, the squadron moved to North Africa and subsequently took part in the Tunisian, Sicilian and Italian campaigns.
No. 150 was disbanded (in Italy) early in October 1944, but re-formed in England a few weeks later as a Lancaster heavy-bomber squadron, and between 11th November 1944 and 25th April 1945, flew 827 operational sorties, and dropped more than 3,827 tons of bombs on enemy targets. In so doing it lost 8 aircraft and 40 aircrew. After finishing bombing operations the squadron was employed on dropping food supplies to the starving Dutch people, transporting ex-P0W's from Belgium to England, and also ferrying personnel from Italy to this country.
For the full text, see here
Sources: Royal Air Force

Crash in which the 150 squadron was involved:

* Crash of Wellington BJ831-JN fallen to Kersbeek on 25/08/1942
* Crash of Battle P2336-JN fallen to Neufchâteau on 12/05/1940
* Crash of Wellington X3745-JN fallen to Sart-St-Laurent on 9/09/1942
* Crash of Wellington X3414-JN fallen to Rienne on 25/08/1942
* Crash of Wellington BJ651-JN-M fallen to Huldenberg on 25/08/1942

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